IMPORTANT MEETING UPDATE 

Understanding cytokine and interferon biology is fundamental to human health and disease such as COVID-19. We are still planning on holding the Annual Meeting, 1-4 November 2020. However, as the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has not peaked in many parts of the world, we will remain flexible with our plans. The Organizing Committee is closely following the guidance of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO), along with Washington State and Seattle public health authorities, and are following developments within the academic and business communities concerning travel and meeting policies. Based on recommendations from these agencies we will decide whether the meeting will be held as planned in Seattle, whether we will hold a virtual meeting instead of gathering in person, or a combination in person/virtual meeting. So, either way, we encourage you to prepare and collaborate with colleagues for Cytokines 2020.

The International Cytokine & Interferon Society and its members have made sustained efforts to understand the host response to pathogens. The interferons and cytokines are central to controlling viral infection and developing effective vaccines.

In the coming weeks and months, we expect there may be a number of changes and updates and will ensure that all ICIS members and attendees have access to the information they need in a timely fashion. Updates will be available on seattle.cytokinesociety.org, through ICIS social media and email. Current deadlines for abstract submission and registration can be accessed at seattle.cytokinesociety.org/important-dates/ .

Current deadlines for abstract submission and registration can be accessed on seattle.cytokinesociety.org. In the coming weeks and months, we expect there may be a number of changes and updates and will ensure that all ICIS members and attendees have access to the information they need in a timely fashion. Updates will be available on seattle.cytokinesociety.org, through ICIS social media, and through email, where applicable. 

The virus that causes COVID-19, called SARS-CoV-2, shown here in an electron microscope image, can trigger severe cases of infection in some younger patients. Studying them could help scientists pinpoint genetic mutations that make people more susceptible to the disease. Credit: NIAID-RML

Plan to Present your Cytokine & Interferon Research, CYTOKINES 2020 Seattle, USA

Call for Abstracts

The International Cytokine & Interferon Society would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of Cytokines 2020 !

As of today…

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